blog - marketing

How To Make Video Testimonials Work For you

September 23, 2017

Filed under: General

Social Media Marketing – it’s on everyone’s lips these days. The questions to ask yourself  is not if you should be using social media, but how you should be using it. Social media is fast becoming much more mainstream. Apart from Facebook, Twitter, Digg and LinkedIn (to name a few), another medium that has gained traction over the years is YouTube.

Popular TV programs such as Glee and America’s Got Talent opened up their auditions via YouTube. Teen singing sensation, Justin Beiber, was discovered on YouTube. Thousands of brands these days showcase their promotions and launch new products via their YouTube channel. You can do the same via YouTube or a web Video. All it takes is a little imagination and creativity.

Your customers are your best sales people. Why not build customer confidence with a web Video testimonial? There’s nothing more credible than having your customers talk about their experiences with your company, in their own words. Word-of-mouth, even if it is viral, is so powerful. Where do you start?

Ted Page, cofounder and creative director of Captains of Industry a marketing agency and video-production company based in Boston, oversees the creative development of videos, and interactive Web marketing campaigns for a range of renewable energy and clean-tech clients. He’s come up with the top 5 reasons why, plus 10 tips for making testimonials work harder for you and is based on an e-book, "How to Make Customer Video Testimonials."


WHY

1. Credibility
Having real people on camera who have had a great experience with your brand lends unassailable credibility to your message. Your customers are your very best salespeople. They are the ones who can honestly and credibly explain to potential customers that their solar panels are cutting their electric bill, or that their vacuum cleaner is the best.

 

2. Your website is a TV channel. Make sure it has good content that people want to watch
Your web TV channel is on 24/7. And the best part is, since you're not paying a network to air your commercial, or a magazine to place your ad, your media costs are zero. Accordingly, the process of having customer testimonials on your website is simplified.

 

3. More referrals
Customers are honoured to go on camera and praise your business. They know that what they say matters and that you value their opinion. It's a source of pride for them. And what do proud people do? They talk with their friends about what they've done. They become, in effect, a more motivated ambassador for your brand. Often, the result is additional qualified sales leads and a lower cost for customer acquisition.

 

4. Give people something to Tweet about
Good content and social media go hand in hand. People see something, then send tweets about it to their friends—amplifying the power of your testimonials.

 

5. Get across the personality of your company
The era of un-advertising on the Web is much more personal and human than the brochure-ware of the past. Nothing speaks to the unique personality of your company better than the people who trusted you—and are glad they did. Your customers are your brand, and they have a lot to say.

Clearly, video testimonials are a perfect fit for almost any company—including yours. Now, here are some tips for how you can make them truly effective.

 

HOW

1. Tell a story
Before you interview people, think about what story you want to tell. For example, do you want to get across that wind farms benefit local economies? Or that your software is easy to use? Once you know what story you want to get across, develop a list of questions that are likely to inspire the interviewee to tell the story you're looking for.
If you are planning to have multiple people in a single video, you can edit the piece so that the various responses string together to create a compelling narrative.

See these examples of video storytelling created for First Wind, a developer and operator of wind farms.

 

2. Make your videos "snackable"
Keep each video less than four minutes—ideally not more than 1-2 minutes long. People hunt for information and prefer to nibble short videos.

 

3. Aggregate your videos in an online media center
A media center like this one from Alteris Renewables makes it easy for customers to browse.

 

4. Guide viewers into your online sales funnel
Picture people at their computers, watching your videos. They've watched three or four, and now they're ready to take the next step... perhaps to request an estimate. The layout of your Web page that's displaying the videos should clearly show your offer and encourage viewers to click.

Think of your videos as cups of delicious coffee at Gloria Jean’s. The longer people hang around, the more likely they are to buy. Just make it easy for them to take action when they're done sipping, or you'll lose them.
You have to be careful, however; you don't want to be in the customer's face, selling overtly. Remember that this is un-advertising: You're educating your customers, but also making clear that you are there for them when they're ready to buy.

 

5. Encourage absolute honesty
When you interview customers, encourage them to tell the unvarnished truth and not to gild the lily just because they're on camera. People see right through BS; they also recognize the truth when they see it.

You might even want to have a customer talk about a situation where, for example, a problem occurred with the product you're selling, and how your company recognized the error and fixed it. That approach gets to the heart of credibility, and your customers will appreciate it far more than canned expressions of delight.

 

6. Optimize your videos for search
Do some research to see what search terms your target audience is using to find solutions such as yours. Then give your videos titles that include those search terms.

In addition, when you post the videos to your Web page or YouTube channel, include some text that's relevant and searchable and make sure the text is in close proximity to the video. Some companies actually publish transcripts or abstracts from the videos on the same page as the videos because search engines can quickly locate text, but not necessarily video files.

In addition, when you publish your videos on sites such as YouTube, add "tags" to each video that put them in easily searchable categories (e.g: solar power, cars, widgets).

 

7. Keep publishing new videos
Just as you're constantly gathering customer case histories for print, it's important to continuously publish videos to your site. Customers like seeing new, fresh stuff on your site. And search engines will rank your site higher if it's frequently updated with new content.

 

8. Interview customers who reflect your ideal new-customer profile
Look at the buyer personas of customer groups that are most likely to buy from you, then find current customers to interview who match those profiles as closely as possible. You want your Web audience to relate to the person they see onscreen.

Also, remember that you're not looking for models. You need people who look real—not like they just jumped out of a David Jones catalogue.

 

9. Intermix shots of your customers with images or video of your product
Seeing just customers on camera can get a bit dull. Spice up your testimonials with a roll showing customers using the product.

 

10. Pre-interview your customers
Have a call with each customer before the shoot to give them a sense of what you'll be talking about. You don't want to tell them what to say, but talking with them beforehand in general terms about the subject can set their mind at ease and help them to be more relaxed during the interview.

 

If your product or service is of a high quality and your customers derive satisfaction from them, they would gladly say positive things about your product in videos. The credibility and acceptability the videos would give you and your product is unquantifiable. Ready to get started?

Contact us if you’d like to develop your new website with a video feature added in.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more insights into the world of digital marketing.

Tags: social media, marketing, video, customers, testimonials

KPIs Everyone In The Marketing Industry Should Be Using

February 23, 2016

Filed under: Business


Simply put, a Key Performance Indicator (KPI) is a quantifiable measure an organization uses to determine how well it meets its planned operational and strategic goals. Getting a handle on understanding what is working and what is not working for your organisation is key to your business growth strategies. As you strive to improve the quality of your products, services and processes, it is important to focus on your customers’ needs and expectations.

 
To do this, you must understand the balance between Performance Measurement and Performance Management and weigh up how these processes can contribute to the strategic impact of your business in four areas of:

1. Cost

2. Revenue

3. Investment

4. Capabilities

 

Performance Measurement focuses on the evaluation of the identification, tracking and communication of performance results. The evaluation of the Performance Measurement process is based on the following five generic performance objectives of:

1. Quality

2. Speed

3. Dependability

4. Flexibility

5. Cost

 


Download PDF of Performance Measurement KPIs

 

Performance Management is a broader strategic process aimed at planning, organising, coordinating, communicating and controlling performance at a strategic, operational and individual level. The data that is gathered should be directly linked to the essential factors that drive the performance of the organization. Here is an overview of the KPIs and supporting metrics to measure performance throughout the marketing funnel. Keep in mind that every organization has its own unique KPIs to measure, monitor, and track.

 




Download PDF of Performance Management KPIs
 

With constant pressure to achieve performance targets, reach higher performance levels, and ensure that people's work supports and furthers organizational vision and strategy, organisations need to develop a scorecard that compares current against previous marketing performance. How are you using KPIs to drive your marketing and business goals while enhancing customer satisfaction and organisational performance? Share your insights below.




About Judith Silva

Judith Silva is a Marketing Strategist and the driving force behind SPINN Media – a boutique creative agency specializing in website design, mobile app development, graphic design and outsourced marketing services. She’s been actively involved in the Advertising, Marketing and Public Relations industry for over 20 years. Judith is a mother of two lovely girls and is crazily in love with her husband of many, many, many years. If you need help getting started with your marketing strategy, get in touch with her at: judith.silva@spinnmedia.com.au 
 

Tags: KPI, KPIs, performance, performance management, performance measurement, process, processes, strategic goals, marketing, organisational performance, marketing performance, performance targets

Essential Do’s And Dont’s For Social Media Marketing

October 30, 2015

Filed under: Social Media



Social media dominates our lives and has evolved to become a fundamental communication channel in the marketing mix. Its constant evolution can make it difficult to stay on top of best practices. A key advantage is its wide reach that helps extend your brand presence and nurture your target audience.

You can use social media to build your Sales Pipeline by delivering high-quality content that demonstrates your expertise in solving your customer’s problem. Always keep in mind the 80/20 rule. Entertain and inform your audience first, sell to them second.


Here’s a simple list of Do’s and Dont's to apply to your day-to-day online social media management.
 

SOCIAL MEDIA DO’S

Do Keep Your Brand Identity Consistent

Establish a clear vision for your brand before you set-up your social media channels. Each social network has a different layout and format, so ensure that items such as your profile image and bio are consistent. Maintaining a consistent brand identity makes it easier for your audience to recognize you. With so many social platforms to choose from, make the time to adapt the voice of your message to match the network. Consistency is key to help boost your image, encourage positive conversations around your brand and strengthen the relationship between you and your company.

 
Do Choose The Right Platform For Your Business

Select the social channel(s) that offer the best potential for reaching your ideal audience and broadcast the type of content you have decided is best suited for your company. Start by creating a basic profile of your ideal client. This should include their age, gender, income bracket, and buying habits. Each social channel has its own personality so research where your customers already are, and where your business fits best. By evaluating each network carefully, and choosing the right ones for you, you will be able to maximize your time and ensure your efforts result in a return on your investment.

 
Do Engage With Your Audience

Have you ever tried to have a conversation with a robot? Put a human face to your brand and be authentic with your conversation. Boost engagement by posting rich and relevant content that will resonate with your audience. This can include photos, memes, videos, blogs, hashtags and gifs. If it hits the spot, it instantly becomes shareable and likeable. Always include a call to action (CTA). When you tell your audience what you want from them, they are more likely to act upon it. Keep experimenting with your posts and over time, you will get the hang of what works best for your brand.

 
Do Build A Community

Building a strong, engaged community of Brand Advocates is so powerful. Brand Advocates are passionate about the brands they love and they have the power to influence the purchase decisions of the people they are connected to. Social media is a great platform to bring people together who share a common goal, interest or cause. Start by fostering a relationship with your followers. Listen to them, discover their interests, address their concerns, ask for feedback and reward them for their participation. Peer recommendation is one of the most effective forms of advertising.

 
SOCIAL MEDIA DONT’S

Don’t Not Have A Social Media Strategy

Social media is no longer an option and should form part of an integrated marketing plan. With so many people engaging in social media, it is difficult to ignore its potential to help businesses reach out to new and existing clients. Many businesses jump into social media with no real strategy or game plan. Done right, it can help you grow your business, generate leads and improve your competitive edge. To build a clear strategy, take into account what you are trying to achieve, who your customers are and what your competition is doing.

 
Don’t Buy Followers or Fans

Did you know that you can buy followers or likes? While it is an easy way to increase your social media numbers, it will ultimately hurt your business. There is a false sense of belief that having high counts of follows or likes on social media sites will give your business additional credibility. When you buy followers or fans, you are not getting people who are interested or willing to engage with you. They do not care about your business or its products, causing your engagement levels drop. You cannot run campaigns successfully when your audience is not ‘real’. Your social media presence should be making an impact organically, and contributing to the success of your marketing campaigns.

 
Don’t Stay Silent

How you respond to potential criticism on social media can make or break your brand. Always monitor activity across the platforms that you are on and keep abreast of developments and activity. Never ignore or delete negative comments. It only serves to anger the already disgruntled customer even more. Do you really want to give them cause to tell all their friends how bad their experience with your company is? Deal with it immediately by offering an apology and offering a solution. Plan what to do in a crisis. Remember, a crisis is an opportunity to prove just how great your organisation is.

 
Don’t Post Too Much

How to connect with your audience without driving them away? Consider the social network you are posting to, then look at the length of your posts, the quality, value of the content you are providing and evaluate if is it strictly promotional. You want your audience to be engaged, not overwhelmed with poor quality content or even worse, spam. Your focus should be on gathering and sharing as much interesting and relevant content as you can. Find the right balance by testing, experimenting, measuring, and improving.

 
Organic growth and engagement is the foundation of any successful social media strategy. What is crucial is that you tailor a strategy that is a good fit for your company based on your business goals. If you could add a tip to the checklist above, what would it be?

 

About Judith Silva

Judith Silva is a Marketing Strategist and the driving force behind SPINN Media – a boutique creative agency specializing in website design, mobile app development, graphic design and outsourced marketing services. She’s been actively involved in the Advertising, Marketing and Public Relations industry for over 20 years. Judith is a mother of two lovely girls and is crazily in love with her husband of many, many, many years. If you need help getting started with your social media strategy, get in touch with her at: judith.silva@spinnmedia.com.au

 

Download Infographic >>

 

 

Tags: social media, social media marketing, social media strategy, marketing, marketing plan, marketing strategy, content strategy, target audience, customer engagement, engagement, sales pipeline, lead generation

10 Ways To Thrive In A Slowing Economy

January 9, 2012

Filed under: Business

With 2012 at a new beginning, your goals and strategies probably look a lot different than they did just last year. As your business evolves with the new economic realities, let us not forget that many of your prospects exist in the same state of insecurity.

It is time to rethink marketing materials that no longer speak to a customer's needs.
Cost-cutting is not the answer; re-engineering value is.

Here's a short list of 10 ways your company can thrive in a slowing economy.

1. Start from the beginning
Refreshing your brand will give you a good excuse to talk not only to all your existing clients but also will allow you to reflect on your communications and core message.

2. Reduce costs and improve your results
You have the choice to send 10,000 postcards or letters where you won’t know if the recipients have read them for $1.50 each (total: $15,000 of admin, creative, print, postage) or send 10,000 emails for $100 and get instant analytics and results. It is time for you to start re-assessing. Don’t stop marketing! Just spend your money wisely by using digital communications.

3. Make your website a real tool
Create interactivity with your target market. Use a silo marketing approach and create additional landing pages specific to each of your products or offers so that readers landing on your pages are not confused by the array of other products or services on your site. Keeping your visitors focused on your page will dramatically increase your conversion rate.

Ensure your website is current and has exciting, relevant content to engage your audience; use your content management system to optimise your Meta tags and key word density within your web pages so the organic searches can find your specific product or services.

4. More communication and more presence
Online strategies are the perfect vehicles for communicating with customers and generating additional purchases. Combine communications using emails, social networking, search engine optimisation, blogs, emails and websites to keep on growing your business and moving forward.

5. Target! Target! Target!
Online database management provides you superior targeting ability. With average conversion rate of around 1.5%, this is an ideal way to reach the other 98.5% that have taken the time to visit your site but haven’t yet converted. So keep communicating.

6. Measure, Track and Survive
Online marketing offers greater measurability while allowing you to track behaviours in comparison to traditional media advertising.

Do you know who has read your advert in the newspaper or magazine? No chance. With email marketing, for example, you can! This is of course due to the awesome technology, where every mouse click is tracked, usually anonymously. Use this data to understand how much each lead and sale costs you.

7. Build your distribution network
Talk to other businesses, yes that’s right you remember the old tool called the telephone…it’s still works to build relationships. Call businesses and start cross promoting your services, develop a referral program and even a joint event with an associated business targeting the same customers and share the costs and the rewards!

8. Convert and manage sales efficiently
During tough times you cannot afford to lose leads and clients, make sure you are using an appropriate customer relationship management (CRM) tool, so you always stay on top of it.

Focus on increasing your conversion and not just the number of new leads or enquiries. Work on your client base as it is 75% easier to convert an existing client to a new sale than pitching to a new customer. Do some research on unconverted leads to find out why they aren't buying from you? Create an online e-learning centre for your staff and your clients. Providing education is a great way to build brand advocacy.

9. Listen to your customers and the market
Send a simple survey to all your clients with a great incentive (never forget the incentive). Read all media, books and relevant business articles to keep you thinking about your business and how you must adapt. If you keep learning through customer feedback and constantly think about how you can improve your offering, you will only continue to grow your business.

10. Forget about the world economy and all media hype
Journalist rarely deliver good news; they exploit the human nature which is constantly craving for sensationalism. Remember the James Bond movie “Tomorrow Never Dies” where Elliot Carver said “there is no news like bad news”, well yes it was a movie but…

Think about it, it’s easier for the media to sell newspaper or advertising if the Headline says “The World Economy has Crashed” than saying the “The World Economy is Great”. The media always exploits negativity to build their own fortune. Stay focused on your business  and keep doing what you do best or better yet, improve everything you are doing!

Now is a great time to reflect and re-invent yourself, to become more efficient and drive your business as hard as possible. What’s stopping you from growing?

Contact SPINN Media today for free health check on your marketing activities.
Remember, standing still is not an option.

Tags: marketing, business, goals, communication, network

Simply The Best

July 25, 2011

Filed under: General

"The one and only rule to remember when you are seeking to stand out from the crowd," says David Tyreman, "is [this]: Don't become part of the crowd in the first place."

Tyreman’s book World Famous: How to Give Your Business a Kick-Ass Brand Identity  is packed with suggestions to help your business gain a powerful presence in the market. The opening page of the book features a quote from Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead: “Success isn't about being perceived as the best at what you do, it's about being perceived as the only one who does what you do."

How do you set your business apart from your competition? Tyreman talks about the need to offer your market a distinct benefit or value. If you pin your hopes on "just buy from me" with no real value proposition, then you will suffer the consequences.

Marcia Lindquist says, “You need to focus on how you do business, determine if you are the best solution for your customers’ problems, and then go out of your way to meet their needs.” She has developed a 5 step process on how you can hone your customer focus for better results.

1. Focus on your customers’ needs and wants.
2. Assess your own strengths and resources.
3. Differentiate with the customers’ best interests at heart
4. Make a map of their needs and wants and record it
5. Focus! Focus! Focus! only on that map and don’t get off-track

There are a lot of businesses out there offering the same products, services and even benefits. Understanding what makes you unique from these companies can help you better position yourself in the marketplace. This is where you convince your clients and prospects to actually buy from you.

What is your stand on this?
Drop us a line or contact us for a free consultation or a cuppa. We would love to meet you.

Tags: communication, marketing, market

Four Tips For Non-Obnoxious Networking

April 22, 2011

Filed under: Business

We’ve been doing the networking rounds lately. It’s amazing the type of businesses and people you meet. As a business owner, the main reason for attending these events is to build relationships and form a professional  link to help refer business on to one another. Why do you attend networking events or forums?

We recently read this excerpt on a email newsletter we received from Marketing Profs:
If you want to step up your networking activities, but you're not quite sure how, Rohit Bhargava has some advice. "The challenge isn't how you can find more opportunities to network," he writes at Influential Marketing, "but how to talk about business in an unobtrusive way."

To accomplish that goal, he offers tips like these:


Hone your conversational skills
Your networking strategy will fail before it begins if no one enjoys talking with you. According to Bhargava, great conversationalists ask leading questions, listen intently to answers and add their own personal stories to the mix.

Create a distinctive nametag
Bhargava decorates his nametags with a sticker of his book's chicken icon. "People want to know why I have that sticker there," he says, "and it gives me a chance not just to share the story of my book, but also to talk about my philosophy of business—which is that personality matters."

SPINN: My business cards says – Chief Inspiration Officer – just under my name and it instantly becomes a talking point and ice-breaker.

Make friends with introducers
"These are the people," he says, "who always come to a moment in their conversations where they say something like 'oh, you do _______? You should talk to _____.'" Introducers are more likely to provide introductions, he notes, when you've made a favourable impression with your conversational ability.

Respect the nature of the event
Unless you're at a networking event—when you can dive right in—always evaluate the situation before you start talking business.

Don’t go into these events thinking you’re there to ‘sell’ your business. Walk in with the intention of making new connections and look at who you can help, professionally. That’s what we do and it’s worked well for us. You may have another way of looking at it. And you know what else? The wealth is in the follow-up. Yes, don’t just collect those business cards and let it go into storage. Write down some memory joggers at the back of the card, like which event you met. Drop everyone an email after the event, telling them how much you enjoyed meeting them the day before. Make plans to catch up for coffee and learn a little bit more about them. Here's where you may start to find synergies or avenues to work together and help one another.

Tags: networking, business, marketing, connections

Email Usability: 6 Tips to get Your Email Read

February 2, 2011

Filed under: Business

You're probably speed-reading this blog post, so we'll get to the good stuff. Here are a couple of tips for getting the important bits of your email read:

 

Keep it short
Interest in the content of an email diminishes as the email extends, so cut the copy and keep the most important points of the message near the top.


Optimize your headlines
As the first two words of a headline are the most important, keep them informational. For example, a headline such as "3 tips for improving email usability and response rates" could be rephrased as, "Email usability: 3 tips for improving your response rates".


Get to the point
Most readers will skip any long-winded greetings or introductory text, so decide if it's worth including. If an introduction is necessary, avoid adding any important information to this section.


Focus the message
Where possible, avoid covering too many topics and keep the message simple. You're only going to have the reader’s attention for a few seconds, so make it count by using a standout call-to-action.


Make it scan-friendly
Limit body copy to easily-readable paragraphs, preferably under 60 characters in width. Selectively use images to reinforce your message, as images often take less time to understand than words.


Align to the left
That's because readers of left-to-right languages (such as English) are accustomed to scanning from the top-left first.


Finally, your email design may only get an average of 51 seconds of fame per reader (if it gets 'read' at all).

How will you make the most of it?


Contact us today for more information on email marketing.

Tags: email, marketing, communications

Eight Questions to Ask When Buying a Marketing List

November 22, 2010

Filed under: Business

We bring you the ‘skinny’ on what you need to look out for when you are considering buying a marketing list. Lately, we've received numerous requests from organisations wanting to purchase mailing lists from us. Unfortunately, we don't sell mailing lists but we can shed some light on what you need to look out for if you are shopping around for a provider.


According to Chris Golec, founder and CEO of Demandbase, a technology company that enables B2B companies to turn Web traffic into sales, “Putting together a list of viable prospects, and ensuring that information about them is accurate and relevant, can be a daunting task. There are a myriad of list and contact vendors in the marketplace today, each with its own set of data."
 

Chris goes on to add, "Buying a marketing list that you have confidence in does not have to be a stressful process if you ask the right questions before you make a decision.” In this excerpt from Chris’ blogpost on Marketing Profs, he highlights eight questions to ask vendors before buying a list:


1. What makes your data unique?
There are many data providers out there, and many pull from common sources, such as Dun & Bradstreet/Hoovers, Jigsaw, or Infogroup. It is important to ask what makes the data in the list you are considering unique, and then determine whether it will complement your current database and serve the campaign you are considering.

If the provider partners with leading data companies, find out whether they also pull from smaller publications and data companies that might help to "fill in the blanks" on their business contact records.


2. How often do you refresh your data?
It's important to know how often your data provider adds names to its database, but it is perhaps even more important to know how often names are removed from the database and what steps are taken to prevent "dead" names from being added back in.

Don't be impressed by claims of "tens of millions" of contacts unless you can verify that the list vendor is actually removing out-of-date information from its system in a timely manner. You shouldn't care about millions if your target audience is just a few thousand people.

In a best-case scenario, the provider runs quarterly checks of its contacts in the database, both to verify the validity of each business contact and to give these contacts the opportunity to opt out of inclusion in the database.


3. How is your data priced? Is there a minimum purchase?
Prices for business-contact records vary widely. If you are required to spend at least $5,000, it might not be such a good deal. The dirty little secret of many data providers is the minimum purchase size.

After you run the parameters for your list, you will likely find that your actual list size falls beneath the requirements for minimum purchase, which could lead to a "back-fill" of contacts that you may not have wanted (or needed). Your response rates will drop because you are campaigning to prospects simply because you paid for their information, not because you selected them. And your reputation may suffer as well if you are marketing to people who are not in your sweet spot.

In addition to inquiring about minimum purchase requirements or what the price breaks might be for larger purchases, ask about the vendor's filtering system to ensure you will not wind up purchasing irrelevant contacts:
• Does it dig into departmental specialties?
• Can you review the titles before you buy to remove irrelevant contacts?
• How specific are the filters regarding company size, number of employees, or industry?


4. How do you handle inaccurate data?
No matter where you get your data, some churn is inevitable, even in the most accurate and highly marketed lists, especially in a down economy. A key factor in handling inaccuracies is to work with your provider to establish some sort of "return policy" in advance of the purchase, if there is not one currently in place.

If you are purchasing an email list, for example, the "hard bounces" after a mailing can be a terrific basis for establishing your list of inaccurate contacts. If you send an email and it is not delivered, the recipient's system typically sends back some sort of notification as to why. A "hard" bounce is when you receive a notification that the non-delivery is due to a permanent condition, such as the intended recipient is no longer at the company. A "soft" bounce is when the notification indicates the non-delivery was due to a temporary condition, such as a full mailbox or an "out of office" situation.

Ideally, the vendor you use for your email campaigns will be able to differentiate between "hard" and "soft" bounces, and the proof of a "hard bounce" is a great basis for handling returns of inaccurate data. Vendors will usually offer a full credit for all business contact data proven to be incorrect, as it helps them maintain database accuracy.


5. Do you remove or credit duplicates for contacts I already own?
A common frustration when purchasing lists is acquiring contacts you already have in your database. Make sure your data provider has some sort of system in place to remove or to credit back contacts you already own, and, if you are a repeat customer, remove contacts you may have already purchased from the provider previously.

Contact providers often track your purchase history so that you will never buy the same contact more than once. In addition, some provider systems can integrate with CRM software to automate the de-duplication process—saving marketers valuable time and money.


6. How are your lists targeted? Do I need to pay for any filters to refine my list?
Some data providers charge you to run filters against their database that help you to target your list to your specific needs. For example, if you were looking for a list of marketing contacts at software companies, you might be charged $300 to remove all nonsoftware companies and another $300 to target the marketers.

An advanced filtering system will allow marketers to zero in on contacts based on geography, industry, industry specialty, seniority (level of contact), department, functional role, and more. The top-tier providers will individually "score" each contact in the database against your specific needs so you can build highly targeted lists.

Data companies charge for filtering to discourage any activity that may reduce the size of the list they are trying to sell. Be aware of both the costs associated with building a more targeted list and the hidden costs to your reputation and response rates if you don't filter your lists and market to contacts who are not in your "sweet spot."


7. Do we own the data, or are we renting the list?
Data providers often rent out their subscriber lists for "one-time" mailings. You send them creative, and they run the email campaign for you and report back on opens and click-through rates. However, the real measure of success is conversions—how many people filled out the form on the Web page that was included in the body of the email. A conversion is the only way to capture the contact information of anyone in the list that you rented.
With a list rental, the cost per lead is much lower than it is for an outright purchase, but you do not own the information and cannot market to contacts again without renting the list again. Make sure to clarify whether the cost per lead is for a rental or for a list purchase.


8. Can I send email to the contacts I purchase from you? Are they "opt-in"?
Email marketing is a tricky business. Many marketers have received spam complaints from paying customers that they have spoken to on the phone, and also have closed business based on unsolicited (but legally CAN-SPAM-compliant) emails.

If you are buying a list from a vendor that is marketed as "opt in," be very careful; and keep in mind that the people on the list have not opted in to receiving emails specifically from your company. Opt-in is the gold standard in email marketing, without a doubt, but CAN-SPAM is the law and it does not cite "opt-in" as a requirement. Agree on a policy internally that will not only preserve your reputation but also allow growth of your brand and sales pipeline through the use of email.

Be aware of the email campaign requirements from your vendors, as some may require you to be able to prove "opt-in" on every email you send, while others simply require you to comply with the law. Also consider paying extra for a dedicated IP address to handle your mailings, because if you are sharing email servers with other companies that do not observe the law as closely as your company, deliverability numbers might suffer as a result of their bad practices.

 

List vendors using best-practices ensure that their contacts have agreements in place allowing for the distribution of their contact information. In addition, the provider should run regular email campaigns to all contacts in the database inviting them to opt out of being included in their list database.

Tags: email, marketing, contacts

5 Items To Delete From Your Website Today

October 11, 2010

Filed under: General

How often have you had marketing experts tell you what your website must have? The must have’s often include: start a blog, monitor social media, or optimize your site for search engines. While all of these things are important, Kipp Bodnar recently created a list of items you should delete as soon as possible from your site. Kipp’s advise is to do something completely different: think about things you should stop doing and offers a few suggestions on things to remove from your business website.

1. Complicated Animations
Flash-based animations can be bad for search engine optimization, but they can also complicate the website experience for visitors. Remember that when users visit your website they looking for something specific. Animations can often be slow to load, which slows down the user and can make them abandon your website. Perform a test. Remove your animation for a set period of time and see how it impacts metrics like lead conversion and time-on-site.

2. Industry Jargon
Your website should be written for your customers. Assuming that potential customers know and understand industry terminology is a mistake. Look through your website and highlight terms that are not commonly used outside of industry circles. If you aren’t sure if a word should be removed, ask one of your customers if they are familiar with it. Delete the highlighted words and replace them with more common explanations.

3. Images
Images are important. Images help to tell a story. However, many websites have too many images. The problem with having too many images is that they can drastically slow down the load time for your website in a web broswer. Search engines also take into consideration page load times when ranking websites. Websites that have been around for a while can often collect lots of images, and some of them no longer go with the content of the site. Keep some images, but go through and remove all images from your website that don’t help tell your company’s story.

4. Long Pages of Text
Research has shown that Internet users don’t like to scroll. Having a product page that is full of text and graphs that takes several scolls to reach the bottom is asking for your information to be ignored. The truth is that if you have long text pages of your website, you are probably trying to communicate too many ideas on that page. Read through and ask yourself, “Is this all about one topic?” If the answer is “no,” then divide that page into a couple short pages that each contain a single idea. This type of simplification will make it easier for your visitors and search engines to understand what your site and business is aobut.

5. “Contact Us” Form
Contact us forms don’t work. Instead of qualified leads, they mostly attract spam. Having your business contact information as part of your website is critical. However, when it comes to using forms, use landing pages. Landing pages provide a dedicated form that is connected to a lead generation offer. For example, if you have a form connected to a free assessment, you clearly know that submissions from that form are related to potential customers who want a free assessment. You don’t have this clarity with a contact us form, and response rates for dedicated landing pages are much higher.

Sometimes, less is definitely more.

Source: Hubspot. Click here for the full post.

Tags: website, marketing, site, customers, contact, information

Email Marketing Permission Guidelines

July 16, 2010

Filed under: General

By far the most important aspect of email marketing is the concept of permission. It’s the only thing separating you from the spammers of this world, but for many, it remains a grey area. It doesn’t need to be. First of all, let’s clarify what spam is, and then what kind of permission you will need to use our email marketing software - SPINN Mail. This is so important, because you may encounter legal issues if you fail to comply with the Australian CAN-SPAM laws.


Being ‘legal’ is not enough - our definition of spam

While the CAN-SPAM laws are a step in the right direction for classifying and reducing spam, we don’t feel they go far enough. Our definition of spam goes beyond the laws in most countries and encompasses what we believe to be true permission email marketing.

Spam is any email you send to someone who hasn’t given you their direct permission to contact them on the topic of the email. But that’s not enough. Permission is a fuzzy word open to interpretation. Let’s get into some specific scenarios so it’s clear what does and doesn’t constitute permission.


The type of permission you MUST have

You can only email subscribers using Campaign Monitor if you obtained their permission in any of the following methods:

They opted in via your web site
This could either be through a newsletter subscribe form or by ticking a checkbox on another form. This checkbox cannot be checked by default and it must clearly explain that checking it will mean you will be contacting them by email.

They completed an offline form and indicated they wanted to be emailed
If someone completes an offline form like a survey or enters a competition, you can only contact them if it was explained to them that they would be contacted by email AND they ticked a box indicating they would like to be contacted.

They gave you their business card
If someone gives you their business card and you have explicitly asked for permission to add them to your list, you can contact them. If they dropped their business card in a fishbowl at a trade show, there must be a sign indicating they will be contacted by email about the specific topic.

They purchased something off you in the last 2 years
By making a purchase from you they have provided their permission implicitly. Feel free to email them but at the same time, we think it’s always better to ask anyway, so why not include an opt-in checkbox as part of the checkout process.


Scenarios that DON’T equate to permission

Basically, anything outside the examples above doesn’t equal permission in our eyes, but here are some examples to make sure we’re crystal clear:

You obtained the email addresses from a third party
Whether you purchased a list, were provided one by a partner or bought a bankrupt competitor’s customer list, those people never gave YOU permission to email them and they will consider your email spam. No matter the claims of the source of this list, you cannot email them with Campaign Monitor.

You scraped or “copy and pasted” the addresses from the Internet
Just because people publish their email address doesn’t mean they want to hear from you.

You haven’t emailed that address for more than 2 years
Permission doesn’t age well. Even if you got their permission legitimately, they won’t remember giving it to you. If you haven’t sent something to that address in the last 2 years, you can’t start now.

Need more information? Contact us and we'll be happy to guide you through the process of utilising email marketing to grow your business.

Tags: marketing, email, email marketing, spam

Make Video Testimonials Work For You

May 12, 2010

Filed under: General

Social Media Marketing – it’s on everyone’s lips these days. The questions to ask yourself  is not if you should be using social media, but how you should be using it. Social media is fast becoming much more mainstream. Apart from Facebook, Twitter, Digg and LinkedIn (to name a few), another medium that has gained traction over the years is YouTube.

Popular TV programs such as Glee and America’s Got Talent opened up their auditions via YouTube. Teen singing sensation, Justin Beiber, was discovered on YouTube. Thousands of brands these days showcase their promotions and launch new products via their YouTube channel. You can do the same via YouTube or a web Video. All it takes is a little imagination and creativity.

Your customers are your best sales people. Why not build customer confidence with a web Video testimonial? There’s nothing more credible than having your customers talk about their experiences with your company, in their own words. Word-of-mouth, even if it is viral, is so powerful. Where do you start?

Ted Page, cofounder and creative director of Captains of Industry a marketing agency and video-production company based in Boston, oversees the creative development of videos, and interactive Web marketing campaigns for a range of renewable energy and clean-tech clients. He’s come up with the top 5 reasons why, plus 10 tips for making testimonials work harder for you and is based on an e-book, "How to Make Customer Video Testimonials."


WHY

1. Credibility
Having real people on camera who have had a great experience with your brand lends unassailable credibility to your message. Your customers are your very best salespeople. They are the ones who can honestly and credibly explain to potential customers that their solar panels are cutting their electric bill, or that their vacuum cleaner is the best.

 

2. Your website is a TV channel. Make sure it has good content that people want to watch
Your web TV channel is on 24/7. And the best part is, since you're not paying a network to air your commercial, or a magazine to place your ad, your media costs are zero. Accordingly, the process of having customer testimonials on your website is simplified.

 

3. More referrals
Customers are honoured to go on camera and praise your business. They know that what they say matters and that you value their opinion. It's a source of pride for them. And what do proud people do? They talk with their friends about what they've done. They become, in effect, a more motivated ambassador for your brand. Often, the result is additional qualified sales leads and a lower cost for customer acquisition.

 

4. Give people something to Tweet about
Good content and social media go hand in hand. People see something, then send tweets about it to their friends—amplifying the power of your testimonials.

 

5. Get across the personality of your company
The era of un-advertising on the Web is much more personal and human than the brochure-ware of the past. Nothing speaks to the unique personality of your company better than the people who trusted you—and are glad they did. Your customers are your brand, and they have a lot to say.

Clearly, video testimonials are a perfect fit for almost any company—including yours. Now, here are some tips for how you can make them truly effective.

 

HOW

1. Tell a story
Before you interview people, think about what story you want to tell. For example, do you want to get across that wind farms benefit local economies? Or that your software is easy to use? Once you know what story you want to get across, develop a list of questions that are likely to inspire the interviewee to tell the story you're looking for.
If you are planning to have multiple people in a single video, you can edit the piece so that the various responses string together to create a compelling narrative.

See these examples of video storytelling created for First Wind, a developer and operator of wind farms.

 

2. Make your videos "snackable"
Keep each video less than four minutes—ideally not more than 1-2 minutes long. People hunt for information and prefer to nibble short videos.

 

3. Aggregate your videos in an online media center
A media center like this one from Alteris Renewables makes it easy for customers to browse.

 

4. Guide viewers into your online sales funnel
Picture people at their computers, watching your videos. They've watched three or four, and now they're ready to take the next step... perhaps to request an estimate. The layout of your Web page that's displaying the videos should clearly show your offer and encourage viewers to click.

Think of your videos as cups of delicious coffee at Gloria Jean’s. The longer people hang around, the more likely they are to buy. Just make it easy for them to take action when they're done sipping, or you'll lose them.
You have to be careful, however; you don't want to be in the customer's face, selling overtly. Remember that this is un-advertising: You're educating your customers, but also making clear that you are there for them when they're ready to buy.

 

5. Encourage absolute honesty
When you interview customers, encourage them to tell the unvarnished truth and not to gild the lily just because they're on camera. People see right through BS; they also recognize the truth when they see it.

You might even want to have a customer talk about a situation where, for example, a problem occurred with the product you're selling, and how your company recognized the error and fixed it. That approach gets to the heart of credibility, and your customers will appreciate it far more than canned expressions of delight.

 

6. Optimize your videos for search
Do some research to see what search terms your target audience is using to find solutions such as yours. Then give your videos titles that include those search terms.

In addition, when you post the videos to your Web page or YouTube channel, include some text that's relevant and searchable and make sure the text is in close proximity to the video. Some companies actually publish transcripts or abstracts from the videos on the same page as the videos because search engines can quickly locate text, but not necessarily video files.

In addition, when you publish your videos on sites such as YouTube, add "tags" to each video that put them in easily searchable categories (e.g: solar power, cars, widgets).

 

7. Keep publishing new videos
Just as you're constantly gathering customer case histories for print, it's important to continuously publish videos to your site. Customers like seeing new, fresh stuff on your site. And search engines will rank your site higher if it's frequently updated with new content.

 

8. Interview customers who reflect your ideal new-customer profile
Look at the buyer personas of customer groups that are most likely to buy from you, then find current customers to interview who match those profiles as closely as possible. You want your Web audience to relate to the person they see onscreen.

Also, remember that you're not looking for models. You need people who look real—not like they just jumped out of a David Jones catalogue.

 

9. Intermix shots of your customers with images or video of your product
Seeing just customers on camera can get a bit dull. Spice up your testimonials with a roll showing customers using the product.

 

10. Pre-interview your customers
Have a call with each customer before the shoot to give them a sense of what you'll be talking about. You don't want to tell them what to say, but talking with them beforehand in general terms about the subject can set their mind at ease and help them to be more relaxed during the interview.

 

If your product or service is of a high quality and your customers derive satisfaction from them, they would gladly say positive things about your product in videos. The credibility and acceptability the videos would give you and your product is unquantifiable. Ready to get started?

Contact us if you’d like to develop your new website with a video feature added in. While we don’t produce videos, we know businesses that do and would be happy to point you in the right direction.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more insights into the world of digital marketing.

Tags: social media, marketing, video, customers

Help Your Business Market Itself

March 1, 2010

Filed under: Business

For so many small business owners, generating leads, converting customers and creating a predictable flow of business is a constant battle. While there are many reasons for this, the primary one is that most small businesses focus all of their marketing attention on selling, when they should really focus every fibre of their being on creating a better customer experience.


According to John Jantsch, a marketing and digital technology coach, award winning social media publisher and author of Duct Tape Marketing and The Referral Engine.


John advises the best way to generate more leads is to create a customer experience that makes people talk. The best way to convert more sales is to create a customer experience that puts sales and marketing on the same team. The best way to create a predictable flow of business is to create a customer experience that builds trust over and over again. Here is John’s advice on how your business can market itself:

 

The logical path
Marketing is getting someone who has a need to know, like, and trust you. Once you’ve established know, like and trust, you can more easily move to creating try, buy, repeat and refer.


These seven steps make up what John calls, the Marketing Hourglass that produces a logical progression of steps from the point where a prospect first becomes aware of your business to where they voluntarily work to help you grow it.


Creating a marketing system that addresses and offers products and processes at every step along this logical path is how you teach your business to market itself.

 

Plug the gaps
Almost every business attempts to move from know to buy, without addressing the phases in between or after. This causes gaps in the customer experience and often leads to generating a customer that’s not a good fit or one that doesn’t value your unique way of doing business.


By carefully plotting how a prospect comes to know your business, how you help them understand and like the unique benefits of doing business with your firm and how you build trust by showing them customer proof and expertise, you properly prepare them to try and buy your products and services.


Of course once a prospect decides to become a customer you must work equally as hard at plugging any gaps in customer service, delivery, packaging, communication, and even finance. In every fashion that your business comes into contact with a customer you are in that instance performing a marketing function.


Ask yourself this question: Does every department in your organization produce positive customer experiences?

Here’s how to find out.

Become a customer of your business. Follow an order or service request around your entire business from advertising to asking for a referral and see how many gaps you can find.

Gaps come in many forms, but the two most common are gaps that are produced intentionally – a process that doesn’t make sense to anyone but Bart in customer service, and unintentionally, no follow-up process to make sure your customer is thrilled.

 

Process and product
As you teach your business to market itself, you need to arm it with products, services and processes that can make this notion a reality.


If you sell a product, surround it with services that allow you to create a better product experiences and repeat sales. If you sell a service, ask yourself what products might enhance your services or be used to create a trail priced version of your service. Ponder these lists of questions as you consider your gaps.


Product/service questions
• What is your free or trial offering?
• What is your starter offering?
• What is your “make it easy to switch” offering?
• What is your core offering?
• What are your add-ons to increase value?
• What is your “members only” offering?
• What are your strategic partner pairings?

Process questions
• How do you identify an ideal customer?
• How do you use content to build trust?
• How do you nurture new relationships?
• How do you present your offerings?
• How do you orientate a new customer?
• How do you assess value delivered?
• How do you teach and educate?
• How do you handle problems?
• How do you create success stories?


If you can address and fill the gaps from know to refer with products, services and processes that create a winning customer experience, creating a well-oiled referral engine will be your reward. Good luck!

Tags: business, marketing, customer

7 Steps to Sleep Your Way to The Top In Business

January 21, 2010

Filed under: Business

Intrigued? These steps are just foreplay to what really goes on inside the pages of 'Sleeping Your Way to The Top in Business – The Ultimate Guide to Attracting & Seducing More Customers'. Author and Public Speaker, Ben Angel admits his new book is certainly not for the fainthearted. His methods for attracting new clients to business are unorthodox and some would even say controversial.

Angel says, “The marketplace is flooded with lookalike businesses, the only way to stand out and attract more customers is to do something very different. Business can no longer afford to sit on the sidelines and remain quiet. With the advent of social media we have seen a significant rise in the number of channels in which consumers are bombarded with by marketing communications. To achieve cut through it is going to take more than a well designed brochure or website to stand out. It requires much, much more.”

Here are Ben's 7 simple strategies you can use to help you bring in New Customers:

1. Social Proof
Social proof or ‘pack mentality’ provides evidence others have tried and tested the scenario, goods or services beforehand and given it the ‘thumbs up’ of approval. Social proof is often the catalyst needed to assist you to convert prospects to new clients. Apply social proof throughout your marketing material by presenting evidence demonstrating others approval of your offerings. This can be done via: testimonials (video & written), media endorsements, commentary on blogs and published articles in your area of expertise in industry journals and magazines.

2. Packaging (Yourself)
Personal branding is self expression amplified to influence and command attention. Identify your most admirable traits and put them to market. The only thing your competitors can’t copy is the essence of who your are as an individual. Just as we have a business brand, we also have a personal brand. To develop it, answer the following question: “What do you want to be known for and why?” This will form the foundation of your personal brand.

3. Be Seductive
The essence of being seductive is learning how to be interesting. Our whole world is built around stories of interest that grab our attention and draw us in. How do you draw your clients in? Do you tell long winded stories about your business? Or, do you share inspirational ideas in which your clients can get what they want? Become an information advocate and produce content that teaches your clients how they can get the results they want whilst engaging them in the process. This may mean up-skilling yearly and even pulling concepts from other industries to add colour to your conversations.

4. Who to Sleep With
There are movers and shakers in every industry. As a business professional who wants to get to the top, you are going to need to identify who these individuals are and make contact with them. Be-friend them and be sincere about it. It is not what you know but who you know. Identify individuals who have access to your target market on mass but are non-competing. Build relationships and work out ways in which you can assist one another. A friend in business will do more for you than a business colleague who happens to be a friend.

5. Groomed Professional
55% of all communication is visual and it only takes four minutes for someone to lock in a first impression and countless meetings to undo it. Studies prove that the better you look (and look after yourself), the more you will get paid and the better you will be treated. Example: Suits that are structured give you a professional appearance to which others draw conclusions about you, such as – that you are professional, structured and care about the finer details. Make the extra effort and you will convert more clients.

6. Flirt or Fail
To flirt is to behave as though attracted to someone, but for amusement rather than with serious intentions. A 2004 study found that there were two types of flirting – romantic and platonic. Platonic flirting in the work environment makes you memorable and creates a lasting impression compared to your dreary counterparts. What you think on the inside appears on the outside. What’s your inner world saying about you? Express your personality appropriately and you will gain the influence and credibility other’s won’t.

7. Move Me
When in the presence of a prospective client, colleague or the media, you will need to move them emotionally if you want any kind of impression that has lasting impact. Shift them energetically throughout your conversations by getting them to experience various positive emotions whilst in your presence. This could be getting them to laugh several times through to sharing stories about their and your personal or business challenges during the conversation. Whatever you do, do not have a monotone conversation that doesn’t make them smile or laugh. Observe yourself in the next meeting you have and see how interesting you really are.


There you have it - The 7 steps you must do to sleep your way to the top in business. Ben’s book 'Sleeping Your Way to The Top in Business' is available exclusively through his website www.benangel.com.au

Tags: business, marketing, communications, customers, social

10 Commandments For Effective Online Social Networking

December 3, 2009

Filed under: Social Media

A 10-step game plan or practical guidelines that will make you a better member of the social-networking communities in which you participate. Full details of this excerpt can be found in author Paul Chaney’s "The Social Media Handyman" (www.thedigitalhandshake.com ).

1. Pull, Don't Push
One of the first lessons you will learn very quickly when engaging in social media is that old-school marketing tactics don't work. Don't come out of the gate pushing your products or services. New tools require new rules.

For example, don't respond to new Twitter followers with a "Thanks for following. Visit my website for a free... [insert promotional message]."

Such a response is a dead giveaway that you are new to social media and do not yet understand that it's a "pull" medium, not a "push" medium. If I want to review your credentials, I'll read your bio. (You did complete your bio, right?)
 

2. Win the Right to Be Heard
Social-media engagement is a conversation, and participation in the community is required. In fact, you might say that participation is the fifth P of marketing. (The four Ps are product, price, place, and promotion.)


Your value as a participant is judged by the value you provide to the community as a whole. Be a "glory hog," and you'll garner little attention. Share freely, and you will become a respected member.
 

3. Content Is Still King, but Conversation Is Queen (and Conversion Is the Prince)
Nothing beats well-written, informative, entertaining content in all its forms: blog posts, tweets, videos, podcasts, images, webinars, or whitepapers. Place yourself in a position of being a knowledgeable expert (assuming you are, of course). Community is the context.

Moreover, keep content and commerce separate. Never the twain shall meet is a good rule of thumb. Editorial and advertorial content should be distant kin, if related at all.
 

4. Authenticity and Transparency Are Social-Networking Cornerstones
The words "authenticity" and "transparency" may seem trite, but I believe they remain the cornerstones of this new media-marketing paradigm. Be real. Be open. Be honest. Admit mistakes when you make them.

 
5. You Don't Have to Be on Every Social Network

It's impossible to maintain an active presence on every social network, and you don't have to. You do have to be where your customers are, however. They expect you to be there.
 

6. Give, and You Shall Receive
Having an attitude of helpfulness goes a long way toward establishing a credible name for yourself in social-media circles. "Seek first to understand, then to be understood," said St. Francis of Assisi. "People don't care that you know, until they know that you care" is how I put it.

"Lose control of your marketing," is how author David Meerman Scott puts it. Give ideas and information away freely, with no strings attached. Be willing to give up control of the marketing message (as if you could hold it close to the vest in the first place, given the current Web 2.0 landscape).
 

7. Don't Throw the Marketing Baby out With the Bath Water
The rules of marketing still apply to social media—well, most of the rules, anyway. Social media is another channel to build your brand and market your message. It's not a panacea, and it's not a replacement for other forms of advertising and marketing.

I have learned that marketing has room for integration. Email and search remain the areas where most marketers spend their top dollars, and for good reason: Email and search both perform very well. All forms of marketing are interrelated, and social media is finding its place in the spectrum.
 

8. Social Media Is a Mindset, Not Just a Toolset
You have to incorporate the essence of social media into your thinking. Don't just change your toolset (tactics); change your mindset (strategy).
 

9. Be Yourself, Whoever That May Be
A good friend of mine has a mantra that she follows in every respect: "Be yourself." (It's even her personalized license plate.) No better advice can be given, whether or not you engage in social media. One thing is certain: You can't be who you are not. (See Step 4.)

Use your photo as your avatar and your name as your handle. That's not to say you shouldn't have an identity tied to your brand. It's just that in social media people would rather relate to and build trust with other people than with brands. It's a trust economy, after all.

 
10. Social Media Is Not a Religion
Although it does come with a set of largely unwritten rules (sorry, I don't know of any stone tablets that have been brought down from Mt. Sinai), social media is not a religion, no matter how hard guys like me try to make it one. There is room for experimentation. In fact, experimentation is the only way the medium will grow.

Tags: social media, marketing, market, brands, customers, video

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